How Denis the hermit led to the Denisovans

An anthropological thriller.

Jamie Shreeve recapitulates the unravelling of the genes from a bone fragment of the finger of a little girl about 8 years old who “probably had dark hair, dark eyes, and dark skin” and who died in a cave in the Altay mountains of southern Siberia between 30,000 and 50,000 years ago.

The Case of the Missing Ancestor

In the Altay Mountains of southern Siberia, some 200 miles from where Russia touches Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan, nestled under a rock face about 30 yards above a little river called the Anuy, there is a cave called Denisova. It has long attracted visitors. The name comes from that of a hermit, Denis, who is said to have lived there in the 18th century. Long before that, Neolithic and later Turkic pastoralists took shelter in the cave, gathering their herds around them to ride out the Siberian winters. …… In the back of the cave is a small side chamber, and it was there that a young Russian archaeologist named Alexander Tsybankov was digging one day in July 2008, in deposits believed to be 30,000 to 50,000 years old, when he came upon a tiny piece of bone. ….. 

Tsybankov bagged it and put it in his pocket to show a paleontologist back at camp. The bone preserved just enough anatomy for the paleontologist to identify it as a chip from a primate fingertip—specifically the part that faces the last joint in the pinkie. Since there is no evidence for primates other than humans in Siberia 30,000 to 50,000 years ago—no apes or monkeys—the fossil was presumably from some kind of human. Judging by the incompletely fused joint surface, the human in question had died young, perhaps as young as eight years old.

.. Anatoly Derevianko, leader of the Altay excavations and director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography in Novosibirsk, thought the bone might belong to a member of our own species, Homo sapiens. …. Derevianko decided to cut the bone in two. He sent one half to a genetics laboratory in California; so far he has not heard from that half again. He slipped the other half into an envelope and had it hand-delivered to Svante Pääbo, an evolutionary geneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. It was there that the case of the Denisovan pinkie bone took a startling turn.

……..

Read the whole article

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About ktwop

Scientist, technologist, salesman, manager, executive and now a consultant and author.
This entry was posted in Ancestors, Denisovans and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to How Denis the hermit led to the Denisovans

  1. Pingback: Ancient humans coped with massive climate change (without the IPCC) | The k2p blog

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